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System Design

These easy to follow infographs offer you an at-a-glance understanding of the size of the UPS systems components required to deliver energy to differing sized requirements.  Simply pick the Load size that best reflects your home energy or commerical premises needs.

MODEST UPS LOAD IN HOUSE

TYPICAL USAGE

lights, computer, Internet and/or fridge

INVERTER SIZE RANGE

5kW continuous power output

DATA CABINET SIZE RANGE

1 X Slimline data rack with up to 3 batteries that would provide 6.6 to 9.9 hours of storage.

HOUSE OR SMALL COMMERCIAL UPS LOAD

TYPICAL USAGE

 

water pump, light, lift, medical equipment, security system, phones and intercom, computers, internet, fridges, car park doors, and/or cooking appliances, data protection, electric doors and sump pumps.

 

INVERTER SIZE RANGE

7.5kW continuous power output

DATA CABINET SIZE RANGE

1 X large data rack with up to 11 batteries that would provide 15 to 36.3 hours of storage.

LARGE COMMERCIAL UPS LOAD

TYPICAL USAGE

medical equipment, commercial refrigeration systems, security system, computer and storage systems, Internet, lifts, car park doors and/or lighting system.

INVERTER SIZE RANGE

15 or 20kW continuous power output or 3 Phase output:  choose from 7.5 / 15 or 20kW continuous power output per phase

DATA CABINET SIZE RANGE

1 X large data rack with a minimum of 7 batteries and up to 20 batteries per cabinet, that would provide from 23.1 hours to an unlimited amount of power storage.

Understanding Power Jargon

Making sense of power jargon, for someone that is unaccustomed to it can be tricky. Here is a breif description of the main terms that describe power usage in a household or commercial property. To get a better idea of your energy usage, we suggest you refer to your last few power bills.

A watt (symbol: W) is a unit of power.

A kilowatt (symbol: kW) is equal to one thousand watts.

A kilowatt-hour (symbol: kWh) is a unit of energy is used at a constant rate over a period of time.

The terms power and energy are frequently confused. Power is the rate of delivery of energy. Power is work performed per unit of time. Energy is the work performed (over a period of time).

Power is measured using the unit watts, or joules per second. Energy is measured using the unit watt seconds, or joules.

A common household battery contains energy. When the battery delivers its energy, it does so at a certain power level, that is, the rate of delivery of the energy. The higher the power level, the quicker the battery’s stored energy is delivered. If the power is higher, the battery’s stored energy will be depleted in a shorter time period.

For a given period of time, a higher level of power causes more energy to be used. For a given power level, a longer run period causes more energy to be used. For a given amount of energy, a higher level of power causes that energy to be used in less time

Electrical energy is typically sold to consumers in kilowatt-hours. The cost of running an electric device is calculated by multiplying the device’s power consumption in kilowatts by the running time in hours and then by the price per kilowatt-hour

Example 1: An electric heater consuming 1000 watts (1 kilowatt), and operating for one hour uses one-kilowatt hour of energy.

Example 2: A television, that has a power rating label that states that the power consumption is 100 watts, in actuality, means the TV uses 100 W per hour. If that TV set runs for 3 hours this equates to 300W or 0.3kW.